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Posted on: February 5, 2024

Sustainable Practices of East County AWP Construction

Dirt near Ray Stoyer Water Recycling Facility

The East County AWP Program is committed to sustainability. This project will create a sustainable drinking water supply by using state-of-the-art technology to purify recycled water. Sustainability is also being practiced during construction through the use of dirt and water.

With that said, the project encompasses an array of pipelines. Work is ongoing on a 10+ mile purified water pipeline that’ll run from the main East County AWP site located just north of Santee Lakes to Lake Jennings in Lakeside.

During the installation of this pipeline, dirt removal has been necessary. Instead of paying to scrap the dirt, roughly 15,000 yards of this material has been hauled to the main AWP site. Crews used it early on in construction to fill in a pond. Additional loads of dirt are currently being hauled north of the Ray Stoyer Water Recycling Facility to later fill the holes of the different tanks once that facility goes offline. This use of dirt from one segment of the project to another not only saves money but it’s resourceful and sustainable.

Ray Stoyer Water Recycling FacilityRay Stoyer Water Recycling Facility

Dirt near Ray Stoyer Water Recycling Facility Dirt Pile Forming Near the Ray Stoyer WRF

Meanwhile, hydrostatic testing is in full swing to test the various AWP structures for leaks. This requires water which has two costs associated with it. The cost to produce the recycled water at the Ray Stoyer Water Recycling Facility and the cost to dispose of it. With more than two dozen structures as part of the project, this could cost upwards of $150,000 for water testing. Instead, the team has come up with a plan to move and recycle the water from one tank to another. This method is more cost-effective and sustainable for the environment.

Lastly, to round out the current sustainable practices of the project, the team only uses recycled water for dust control. These efforts are done by conditioning the dirt with moisture. The yellow fire hydrant you often see in residential neighborhoods is connected to the drinking water distribution system. The crew however, does not use this valuable asset, ultimately, preserving resources and resulting in another $100,000+ in savings.

Sustainability is extremely important to the East County AWP Program. These are the top sustainable practices of the project at this time. We will update this article with more information as construction progresses.

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